Aftercare, Chardonnay and Arizona

Sitting on a panel of mediators in front of an audience of US insurance lawyers last month the topic of mediation aftercare came up. The view on all sides was that when mediations do not settle on the day the mediator’s involvement in the days and weeks that follow is now routine and expected .

Parties expect the mediator to be in contact by phone and email, maybe even over coffee or in a reconvened smaller group. These exchanges can continue over weeks, even months. I have once or twice attended court in mid-trial just before the lunch adjournment at the invitation of the parties to meet them and try to break the deadlock.

Some counsel like a light touch, others want the mediator to push hard. Except in the few cases of truly angry termination (and sometimes even in those) aftercare is taken for granted

Why is it so productive? Companies and individuals can get painted into a corner on the day of the mediation. People get tired and frustrated. Big organisations can simply take time to process a new view of a case as they turn the proverbial super-tanker.

In the hour the panel took to address the conference (in Phoenix, Arizona) I received two text messages.

The first was an unremarkable inquiry from my daughter as to why there was no chardonnay in the fridge at home. But the second from the general counsel of a major media company read simply “Deal Done!”.  A potentially nasty trial between the organisation and its departing Chief Executive had been due to start the next working day. I had overseen an exchange of offers that morning in Phoenix (the afternoon in London) by telephone and email.

I would have punched the air but I was too busy being English.  Sometimes the aftercare seems to be more challenging and more rewarding than the surgery itself.

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