Brick Court in the Pacific

Brick Court mediator, Geoff Sharp, has been teaching mediation at the University of the South Pacific in the Cook Islands this week courtesy of Cook Islands Law Society, New Zealand Law Society and Massey University.

The course was held at the USP campus on the island of Rarotonga in the Southern Group of 15 tiny islands that make up the Cooks. The resident population of all islands in the group is estimated to be between 11,000 and 12,000, almost all Cook Islands Maori.

By the way, the Cook Islands is one of the few countries in the world to ask a question about coconut consumption as a part of its census – and it was revealed in 2017 that 2,947 households use 28,461 coconuts every week. That’s 10 coconuts per home per week!

In some ways teaching mediation anywhere in the Pacific is taking coals to Newcastle, there being a strong tradition of conflict resolution by mediation within Pacifika social order – in particular in the many villages dotted throughout the islands, often remote from any formal system of justice.

But the modern form, especially for civil disputes – which are mainly land issues – has been eagerly awaited. It won’t be long before mediation is mainstream in the Cooks and it will be very colourful with plenty of food, prayer and maybe even song integrated into the process.

Thanks go to other faculty members, Prof Laurence Boulle, Virginia Goldblatt (co authors of Mediation: Skills and Strategies) and Dick Edwards of NZLS CLE who made it all happen.

John Sturrock Features In The Times

In these turbulent times, some might be interested in John’s article published in The Times newspaper yesterday…

Brick Court Mediators In Asia

This week Geoff Sharp was appointed one of a handful of Senior International Mediators to the new Mainland China – Hong Kong Mediation Center.

Being the first joint mediation center in the region set up by two major mediation institutions in Mainland China and Hong Kong, the Center aims to provide an effective platform for resolving cross-border commercial disputes between Mainland China and Hong Kong, in particular with China’s “Belt and Road” initiative.
The Center is a joint venture between the China Chamber of International Commerce and the Hong Kong Mediation Centre, with the vigorous support of the Department of Justice.
The Belt and Road inititive together with the National 13th Five-Year Plan means cross-border trade is set to increase drastically and commercial disputes are expected to follow.

 

Off With The Wig!

This speech by The Hon Tom Bathurst AC, Chief Justice of New South Wales on 30 March 2017 addresses issues arising for advocates switching from the courtroom to the mediation table and is worth a read.

The Judge discusses what advocates should keep in mind when moving from litigation to mediation and back again.

I want to first discuss the ways in which advocates need to shift gears when moving from a litigation to a mediation terrain, employing different models of advocacy in each setting. I will then move to consider how a lawyer’s ethical duties may manifest themselves differently despite having the same essential content in both venues. Finally, I will discuss the extent to which practitioners are covered by advocate’s immunity from suit when representing clients in mediation…

Olivia Rundle has famously categorised five ways in which lawyers may participate in mediation. This ranges from;

  1. the absent advisor, who assists the client to prepare but does not attend the mediation
  2. the advisor observer, who attends the mediation but does not participate
  3. the expert contributor, who participates but only to the extent of providing the client with legal advice
  4. the supportive professional participant, who directly participates in concert with the client
  5. the spokesperson, who speaks for, and negotiates on behalf of, the client. It is only this final model that replicates the lawyer’s role in court.

… It is important that advocates give consideration to these roles before entering mediation so as not to either hijack the process or leave their client insufficiently supported.

No surprises that the sweet spot for a mediation advocate is to be high on the both the relationship and the expertise scale.

Read the full speech here

Mediation Thought Leaders 2017

wwl_logo_2014Brick Court is home to 4/10
...Well done to all our colleagues
Great to be in such good company

In its latest round of global research Who’s Who Legal recognise ten mediators who obtained the highest number of nominations from peers, corporate counsel and other market sources as thought leaders and that they are worthy of special mention not only because of “their vast expertise and experience advising on some of the world’s most significant and cutting-edge legal matters” but also “their ability to innovate, inspire, and go above and beyond to deliver for their clients”

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