Representing Small Players in Multi Party Mediations

A good piece from Don Swanson, a lawyer out of Omaha, Nebraska, on representing bit players in large multi party mediations – we’ve all been there – other parties focused on the ‘big’ issues and it’s hard to get anyone, including the mediator, to focus on your supporting actor who has lower tier, but still crucial-to-them, issues.

Some extracts follow, but Don’s full article repays reading;

Many small players get run over—and their positions obliterated—in multi-party negotiations.

Small-parties are faced with limited choices on how to proceed;

1. Take an unbending position and hold out to the end—this is an all-or-nothing approach

2. Take an unbending position for as long as possible and then accept the best deal that’s offered

3. State an opening position and engage in active negotiations to achieve the best-possible result

Sometimes, the selection among choices is actually imposed upon a small-party by the dominant ones.

Otherwise, the answer on how-to-proceed is a judgment call in light of all known facts. In large part, the judgment call turns on the traction a party can create for its position. And traction turns on the answer to this question:

How significant is my position for the dominant parties?

Here are some traction-related questions to ponder:

>If I hold out to the end, can they move on without me—or do they need my consent?

>If they can move on without me, how valuable would my consent be to them—and what might I achieve that’s commensurate with that value?

>As a practical or legal matter, what do the dominant parties want or need from me? And what would they be willing to provide to get my consent?

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