The Singapore Convention

Settlements reached in cross border mediation will soon be enforceable internationally just like arbitral awards when UNCITAL’s Singapore Convention, the first UN treaty named after Singapore, comes into force in August next year provided sufficient countries ratify.

As a result, there is an expectation by Singaporean authorities that the city state’s most favoured status as an international mediation venue will be further confirmed.

Seen as mediation’s answer to the New York Convention that allows for the easy enforcement of arbitration awards, the Singapore Convention comes on top of much mediation activity in Singapore having last year also enacted a Mediation Act whereby mediated agreements can be recorded as orders of Singapore’s courts, allowing parties to enforce their terms more easily.

Key terms of the Singapore Convention include*;

Article 1 outlines the scope, applying the Convention to cross-border commercial disputes resolved through mediation where “at least two parties to the [written] settlement agreement have their places of business in different States” or in which parties “have their places of business different from either the State in which a substantial part of the obligations under the settlement agreement is performed or the State in which the subject matter of the settlement agreement is most closely connected.” Article 1 specifically excludes settlement agreements related to consumer, family, inheritance, and employment matters, as well as those enforceable as a judgment or as an arbitral award.

Article 2 defines key terms used in the Convention such as “place of business,” “in writing,” including in electronic form, and even “mediation.”

Article 3 summarizes the general principles and obligates member States that ratify the Convention and also permits a party subject of the Convention to invoke a defense and to subsequently prove that a particular dispute being raised was already previously resolved by a settlement agreement.

Article 4 provides a specific but broad checklist of what a party must supply for enforcement of the international settlement agreements that result from mediation. Article 4 includes submission of a “settlement agreement signed by the parties” and “evidence that the settlement agreement resulted from mediation.” Evidence includes items “such as” a “mediator’s signature on the settlement agreement,” or “a document signed by the mediator,” or “an attestation by the institution” administering the mediation. In the absence of such proof, Article 4 allows a party to submit “other evidence” acceptable or required by a competent authority of the member State where relief is sought. Article 4 also addresses key issues related to electronic communication, translation of settlement agreements, and calls for the competent authority of the member States enforcing the settlement agreements to “act expeditiously.”

Article 5 was vigorously debated and certain overlaps within the Article are intentional to accommodate the concerns of a member State’s domestic legal systems. Article 5 includes the grounds when a competent authority may refuse to grant enforcement. These circumstances include incapacity of a party, or where the settlement agreement a) is null and void, inoperative or incapable of being performed; b) not binding or not final; c) was subsequently modified; d) was performed; e) is not clear or comprehensible; or where granting relief would be contrary to terms of the settlement agreement or contrary to public policy, and subject matter is not capable of settlement by mediation under the law of that party. A competent authority may also refuse to grant relief where there is a serious breach by the mediation of standards applicable to the mediator or the failure by the mediator to disclose to the parties’ circumstances as to the mediator’s impartiality or independence.

Article 6 addresses issues of parallel applications or claims and draws inspiration from the New York Convention. It grants, to the competent authority of the member State where relief is being sought, wide discretion to adjourn its decision under the Convention where an application or claim relating to a settlement agreement was made in a court, an arbitral tribunal, or other competent authority.

Article 7 also draws inspiration from the New York Convention and allows member States flexibility to enact national legislation in their countries to expand the scope of settlement agreements excluded by Article 1, Paragraphs 2 and 3 of the Singapore Convention.

Article 8 allows for a tailored adoption of the Convention by each member State, allowing for two reservations when ratifying the Convention. The first reservation is one which relates to the member State or its own governmental agency. The second allows for a declaration that the Convention applies only where the parties to the settlement agreement resulting from mediation have agreed to the application of the Convention.

* Singapore Convention: A First Look by Deborah Masucci and M. Salman Ravala

Brick Court mediators are active in Singapore and Hong Kong and would be delighted to talk to you about mediating in Asia.

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